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FLORAL DISPLAYS IN CUMBRIA
Sometimes, wildflowers put on a massed display which, although in a single colour, can be an impressive sight. It also usually means a habitat that has been undisturbed for years if not decades. Here are some examples, roughly in order of flowering during the season.
The Wild Daffodil quickly reduces in numbers if the woodland becomes dense and light is excluded. Consequently, woodland displays are scarce and large displays are more usually seen in old church yards.
Wood Anemones spread slowly, so a large dispaly often indicates old woodland that has existed for a very long time.

Intensive agriculture has caused a decline in the number of large displays of Primrose - some of the best displays occur on railway lines, like that between Preston and Lancaster, where the east bank is covered first and the west bank a fortnight or so later.
Bluebell woods are traditional sight in Cumbria, the wet Atlantic seaboard being their favoured location.
Ransoms are not everyone's cup of tea but they can put on a rather stunning, but short-lived, display.
Bird's-foot-trefoil can produce impressive carpets where the scattered seeds can germinate, as in this short turf.
The same spot also suits the Bee Orchid - this "swarm" is unusual if not impressive in colour.

Ox-eye Daisies and Kidney Vetch find the thin alkaline soil of this old iron slag bank to their liking.